Taking Custom Orders Now! No set up fee 704-528-2600 Kelly@phds4u.com

Roanoke Island, North Carolina - Coastal Map - Wood Laser Cut Map

  • Sale
  • Regular price $199.99


This is a beautifully detailed, laser engraved and precision cut topographical Map of Roanoke Island in Dare County on the Outer Banks in North Carolina with the following interesting stats carved into it:

In 1587, the English tried to settle in Roanoke Island again. John White, father of the colonist Eleanor Dare and grandfather to Virginia Dare, the first English child born in the New World, left the colony to return to England for supplies. He expected to return to Roanoke Island within three months. Instead, with England at war with Spain, all ships were confiscated for use of the war efforts. White's return to Roanoke Island was delayed until 1590, by which time all the colonists had disappeared. The settlement was left abandoned. The only clue White found was the word "CROATOAN" carved into a post, as well as the letters, "CRO" carved into a tree. Before leaving the colony three years earlier, White had left instructions that if the colonists left the settlement, they were to carve the name of their destination, with a Maltese cross if they left due to danger. "CROATOAN" was the name of an island to the south (modern-day Hatteras Island), where a native tribe, friendly to the English was known to live. Colonists might have tried to reach that island. However, foul weather kept White from venturing south to search on Croatoan for the colonists, so he returned to England. White never returned to the New World. Unable to determine exactly what happened, people referred to the abandoned settlement as "The Lost Colony."

Possibly the oldest cultivated grapevine in the world is the 400-year-old scuppernong "Mother Vine" growing on Roanoke Island. The scuppernong is the state fruit of North Carolina.

Wanchese – Believed to be the first fishing village of the Outer Banks, as local Native Americans dating back to 900 A.D. settled here and made treks either by boat or along the shoreline to reel in the bounty of the Roanoke Sound. Today, commercial vessels and seafood dealers congregate to sort through the day's catch, and provide fresh NC seafood for virtually all of the Eastern Seaboard.

 

You may also like:

Your lake of choice Boat Paddle